Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning

Announcements Archive

Tuesday, Dec 4, 2018

Workshop Announcement!

Beginning January 2019

Although many faculty already integrate diverse perspectives, materials, and pedagogical approaches into their courses, many of us also struggle to this, either because we teach in disciplines that don’t seem to lend themselves readily to this approach and/or we lack the training we need to do this effectively.  We will bring together 10-15 colleagues from the arts, humanities, education, business, social sciences, and physical sciences who have a keen interest in diversifying both their course content and teaching strategies, but haven’t yet found ways to do this successfully. We especially encourage faculty in disciplines where incorporating diversity is perceived to be particularly difficult to apply.

 

This workshop is open to all full time faculty.  Click here for more information and to apply.


Monday, Oct 29, 2018

It’s time to think about the Wakonse Teaching Conference! 
Seriously.  You—yes, you—want to go to this conference.

May 23-28, 2019

Wakonse (http://wakonse.org) is a yearly “professor camp” on college teaching that takes place at Camp Miniwanca on beautiful Lake Michigan in Shelby, MI (about an 8 hour drive from UNI). UNI has brought a group of faculty to the conference for the past 5 years, and we’ve come home feeling edified, relaxed and rejuvenated! 

What you do: Pay $100 for registration. You will also need to pay for your food when we’re driving to and from the conference.

What the CETL does: Pays for the rest of your registration.  Drives you to the conference and back.  Offers you the opportunity to learn new stuff about teaching, to get to know faculty from different disciplines and institutions from around the country, and to hang out on the shores of beautiful Lake Michigan for 4 days. 

 

If you are interested in going, or want more information, please email susan.hill@uni.edu.  We’ll have a CETL information session on Wakonse in Feb. 2019.


Monday, Oct 29, 2018

Workshop Announcement!
“Expanding Your Curriculum: Strategies for Making Your Courses More Diverse and Your Classroom More Inclusive”

Beginning January 2019

Although many faculty already integrate diverse perspectives, materials, and pedagogical approaches into their courses, many of us also struggle to this, either because we teach in disciplines that don’t seem to lend themselves readily to this approach and/or we lack the training we need to do this effectively.  We will bring together 10-15 colleagues from the arts, humanities, business, social sciences, and physical sciences who have a keen interest in diversifying both their course content and teaching strategies, but haven’t yet found ways to do this successfully. We especially encourage faculty in disciplines where incorporating diversity is perceived to be particularly difficult to apply.

During this workshop we will:

  • identify the characteristics of diverse courses and inclusive classrooms;
  • examine strategies for infusing more diverse materials and assignments into existing courses;
  • gain students’ perspectives on what makes an inclusive classroom, and explore classroom approaches that support inclusion
  • learn with each other in a relaxed and collegial atmosphere.

This workshop is being offered in partnership with the CME and the student organization, A.C.T.I.O.N, who are bringing the “Humanize My Hoodie” Project to UNI.  Workshop participants group will meet with Jason Sole and André Wright, the creators of the Humanize My Hoodie project on Friday, January 25.  A.C.T.I.O.N. will also present their diversity and inclusion training at the workshop to provide faculty members with student voice and experience directly drawn from the UNI campus. 

This workshop is open to all full time faculty.  Click Here to Apply!


Wednesday, Oct 17, 2018

Can you picture yourself...

  • using your experience as a student to help make valuable contributions to effective teaching and learning at UNI?
  • building the skills of an effective observer, communicator, and collaborator in a professional setting?
  • enhancing your own skills as a lifelong student and dynamic professional while putting yourself in someone else’s shoes?

The truth is this: your professional life has already begun! As a PANTHER Learning Partner you can discover your own sense of purpose in a brand new course and program that brings students and faculty together as active collaborators in teaching and learning.

To learn more and to submit an application, visit: https://cetl.uni.edu/panther-learning-partners

 


Tuesday, Sep 25, 2018

Mid-Term Course Evaluations, or SGIDs

Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) is a method of formative course evaluation that uses a trained, outside facilitator to conduct a mid-semester discussion with students to provide feedback to an instructor. SGIDs usually take 50 minutes, and work most effectively in courses with 20-75 students (if your course doesn’t fit these parameters, contact Jonathan). SGIDs are best done between weeks 7-10 of the semester, and are very helpful for making mid-course adjustments and clarifications in a course. If you are interested in having a SGID done in a course this semester, please complete the form here: https://goo.gl/forms/Q4uekpXNcQVaSrGi1 …..Questions?  E-mail jonathan.chenoweth@uni.edu


Tuesday, Sep 25, 2018

Panther Learning Partners

UNI is poised to join a small but growing number of schools who engage students and faculty as active collaborators in teaching and learning. In this program -- PANTHER Learning Partners -- participating student-partners are consultants to their faculty partners as needed, serving as recorder/observers, interviewers, design consultants, "primed" observers, and more. These students are not enrolled in their partners' courses, but rather in a concurrent training and practicum course developed by the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.

The goal is to capitalize on the reciprocal benefits that flow from a transposition of student and faculty perspectives, illuminating blind spots or gaps in understanding.

The CETL would like to shape this program in ways that answer the needs and interests of UNI students and faculty, and we need your input to do so. If this concept intrigues you, we ask you to weigh in through a five-minute survey here: https://goo.gl/forms/IdbnpUg6U92sL3Lj1


Monday, Sep 24, 2018

Monday, September 24, 7:00-8:30 pm, ScholarSpace, Rod Library

Presenters: McNair Scholars Kyla Ford and Dante Miller

Kyla Ford “Evaluating School Conduct Policies in Relation to School Violence”
This presentation examines the relationship between the kinds of responses to violations in school conduct policies and the severity of violence in schools from 2016-2018 in the U.S.

Dante Miller “Remembering Obama in the Era of Trump”
This presentation examines the idea of post-racial ideas and their relationship to U.S. history, particularly in relation to the elections of Obama and Trump.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminology, CSBS, the CETL and the Office of the President


Wednesday, Sep 19, 2018

Monday, September 24, Noon - 1 PM, Library 378
Presenter: Angela Pratesi

Wikipedia is the fifth most used website in the world. Our students are using it. We are using it. But it is more than just a quick source of information. By incorporating Wikipedia assignments into a course, you can harness the free encyclopedia as a tool to help students practice and hone their research and writing skills. At the same time, their work can improve the quality and scope of information available to people around the world. Come learn about the benefits of Wikipedia assignments and a variety of ways you can include them in your classes

 


Monday, Sep 17, 2018

Wednesday, September 19, Noon - 1PM, Library 378

Panelists: Shelley O’Connell, Health & Wellness Services, Jennifer Schneiderman, Counseling Center, Allyson Rafanello, Dean of Students

Many UNI students face mental health issues, and UNI data shows that midterms can be particularly challenging. How can we recognize when our students are in distress?  What kinds of services are available to them?  What can you do as a faculty member?  Come learn what you can do to help students in distress, ask questions about mental health issues, and learn what resources are available for students and faculty/staff to address mental health concerns.


Thursday, Sep 13, 2018

Tuesday, September 18, 3:30-4:30, Library 378
Lisa Kopf, Communication Sciences and Disorders

Does your voice ever feel tired after a long day of teaching? You’re not alone! Individuals who use their voice a lot as part of their job, including faculty members, are at increased risk for developing voice problems. In this workshop, you’ll learn some tips and strategies that can help you maintain a healthy voice.


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